Tag Archives: flickr

Newsrewired: so how many readers plus DO we have?

I WAS overwhelmed by the positive reaction to my presentation at last week’s excellent news:rewired conference, but slightly annoyed with myself for not having a better answer to Hannah Waldram’s question afterwards.

My presentation was about building online communities, and the concept of the reader plus – the elusive category of cheerleader readers: demanding customers, but the most effective marketing you could ever ask for.

The slides from the presentation are here and the post where I first came up with the lamer-the-more-I-hear-other-people-say-it “readers plus” is here.

In the questions afterwards, Hannah asked me what percentage of our readers did I think were readers plus. The best answer I could come up with then was “I’m not sure.” But really, since I’m trying to persaude people that the time spent getting them is worth it, I should know. So I’ve been thinking about it and here’s my best estimate.

Flickr: I’d say 25 per cent are genuine readers plus. I know this because we talk to them not just on Flickr, but on Facebook and Twitter and face-to-face occasionally! Because what they do is just a specific area of interest, I think the very fact of our taking an interest has been enough to transform the way they think about the paper or at the least challenged their expectations of us.

Facebook: The best I can say here, is I’m working on it! Putting effort into Facebook is a recent development, and Facebook doesn’t tell you how many times your links are shared by friends, so the only thing we have to go on is comments and traffic figures coming to our site. As I said on Friday, traffic from Facebook has tripled and comments are building. We’ve got some facebook friends who definitely COULD be readers plus but I’m not sure we’re quite there yet!

Twitter: Based on retweets and interaction, I’d say twenty percent of our twitter followers are definite readers plus. It may be more, but obviously I don’t know what people are saying about us when I’m not listening!

Hopefully that’s a fuller answer than “I don’t know” – and sorry I didn’t say this at the time.

For those who asked about how exactly we use facebook etc, you can see for yourself here:

bournemouthecho.tumblr.com
flickr.com/bournemouthecho
flickr.com/groups/echoyear/
twitter.com/bournemouthecho
facebook.com/bournemouthecho (my work profile)
facebook.com/bournemouthdailyecho (our Facebook page)
We also have a pretty neglected YouTube account at youtube.com/bournemouthecho, and of course there’s the comments at bournemouthecho.co.uk.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , ,

Blogging the weather: brilliant or stupid?

We’ve been using CoverItLive for football games for some time now, but I’ve never managed to persuade the news desk to utilise it for breaking news stories or for liveblogging meetings.

So when it snowed last week I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to show them what I meant.

The first snow day we didn’t handle very well. The web editor and I were both snowed in, so while we could go out and get pictures and video it was hard to run the story from our respective homes.

We didn’t have school closures, the information was patchy and scattered across ten or twelve four par stories – so while we did the best we could, I thought we could do better.

For snow day two, we’d set up a liveblog in preparation. We’d agreed to run three stories maximum, one for traffic updates, one for school closures and one main story, plus the blog.

@markng remarked on Twitter “I can’t decide if it’s a brilliant idea, a silly idea, or both.”. I couldn’t either.

We were, after all, liveblogging the weather. But we decided to see how it went.

One of the issues with CIL is that we only get one page impression per viwer, despite the endless refreshes the blog goes through. The words on the blog also don’t count for SEO purposes, so our using it isn’t terribly popular with the men at the top.

To compensate, I asked people to send us their pictures by text to our SMS service, linked to the live traffic feed and the school closure list regularly and tried to make sure some of the people taking part in the blog visited as many of our other pages as possible.

It started gently, about 100 people or so in the first half hour as the snow started to fall heavily…. but it very quickly turned into a monster of a thing.

Reporters would tell me about closures and cancellations, I’d add them to the blog, then the web editor updated the website. The reporters could then use our stories and blog to pull together copy for the paper.

People sent us dozens of pictures from out of their window. Photographers texted and emailed me pictures from their jobs.

We sent reporters out with Flip video cameras, first from the top of the office roof, then to the beach, where the snow was settling on the sand, then to the hill outside the office, where the snow had made it lethal for cars and pedestrians. We did a video vox pop and uploaded all the videos directly to YouTube (avoiding the we can’t edit the Flip video issues that we still haven’t resolved) so I could embed them in the blog.

By the time I got up from my desk at about 2pm we had 1800 people taking part. They were telling us about bus and school closures before we could get the information from the official sources.

As people started to think about going home they came to ask each other about the route home, which roads were passable, where it was still snowing and so on.

We published 26 pictures and nine videos and 600 reader comments. We were also running a #bmthsnow hashtag at our @BournemouthEcho Twitter account, and I fed comments and updates from Twitter on to the blog too. We linked to Twitpics and Vimeo videos, the BBC weather site, our Flickr groups, our Facebook page and our own stories.

We ran the blog from half nine until half four, when I had to leave. We couldn’t persuade any of the reporters to take the blog over, sadly, but the weather was clearing up by then, so it could have been worse.

Final stats were:

Total Unique Readers who pressed ‘Watch Now’: 2298

Total Unique Readers who watched for over 1 minute: 2298

We had several comments from readers about how helpful they had found it. The editor wants us to use if for breaking news more often. And the people in charge of development at Newsquest are looking at building a liveblog that works like CIL but will give us the page impressions.

So all in all, I’m counting it as a bit of a result. What do you think?

You can replay the blog here:

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Nine resolutions for 2009

They’re a bit late. But here’s nine resolutions for 2009

This year I’m going to:

1. Integrate our burgeoning social media audience with our homepage.

Specifically this requires: persuading the powers that be to let us self-host http://bmthblog.wordpress.com, http://roundfortea.blogspot.com/ and a photography blog in the style of the Croydon Advers (hat tip Martin Stabe for pointing it out Jo Wadsworth for filling me in on the details)
Why? We can’t pretend that being part of the blogosphere/twitterverse/flickrverse is going to be enough. While we are a for profit business we need to translate that into something, page impressions, advertisting eyeballs, unique users.

2. Recruit some new bloggers
3. Develop the dismal dorsetbusiness.net into something that’s relevant and useful
4. Look for ways to monetize that have value for us, our readers, and the advertisers. I’m not going to leave this entirely to the ad department. Why should I? It’s my business too.
5. Reorganise the navigation on our website so it’s easier to work out where things might be
6. Persuade, by demonstrating, that responding to comments, being transparent about mistakes and  linking to source material is a good way to build trust with online readers
7. Persuade the powers-that-be to let us have a twitter feed and feed aggregators as part of our site, not sneaked in though the back door.
8. Produce more news. Leading by example is the best way, they say. I’m not a sub anymore. And while I don’t, as yet, have a job title, I’m going to get a bit Gandhi and be the change etc etc
9. Nine is tricky. It involves taking an as-yet-unformed idea, a bit Regret the Error, a bit Newsmixer, aimed at preempting the ‘yes, but –‘ response readers often have to news stories, and turning it into something workable. I’ve no idea if it’s possible without being extremely labour intensive. But I’m going to try!

Tagged , , , , , , ,